Tag Archives: Translation

We all deserve a little sunshine

Standard

Authentic Inclusion

Having just returned from a round trip that took in the Bologna Children’s Book Fair and the London Book Fair, I thought it was about time I posted details of the books and themes that caught my eye.  At both fairs,  I was lucky enough to attend a series of panels about diversity in children’s books and the importance of publishing books that mirror a child’s own experience while also providing windows into lives that they would have no other access to. I wrote a report about it here for Words Without Borders.
I’m happy to say I came away from Bologna with a bit of a spring in my step, partly because of the musical note to many of the panels featuring Bruno Tognolini, Italian poet, children’s writer, television star, not to mention finalist in this year’s Strega Ragazzi Award, and partly because of the line he bewitchingly recited,  “Tu sei tutti e tu sei tu,” – “you are everyone and you are you” – which echoed the general vibe at the fair:

Read the rest of this entry

Multilingual Blogging Day 2013 – Secret Language Series 3

Standard

Thanks for checking back in for Episode 3.

This post is going to discuss one of the secrets of translated fiction, the “to foreword or not to foreword” question; well, for two Pescara authors anyway: Paolo Di Vincenzo, who I’ve been chatting to in previous posts, and a new entry on this blog post, Marcello Nicodemo.   Marcello has already published four novels: Nel Fuoco (alla fine del sogno), Di li’ a poco sarebbe piovuto, Ferragosto in Famiglia, e Voci del Purgatorio which I’ll be covering in more detail in coming weeks.

But before I ask Paolo and Marcello how they feel about literature in translation, what about you?

I’ve just finished a webinar with Oliver Lawrence on how to translate for the travel and tourism industry, and the distinction he drew between the types of reader her translates for – travellers and tourists – made me think of the to foreword or not to foreword debate in translated fiction. When you read a book translated from another language and cultural context, are you looking for the authentic experience and want to find your way around the new context by yourself – so no foreword- or are you one of those people who gets the guidebook and studies it from cover to cover before setting off, like you would with a foreword?

In translated literature, as in world travel, some people prefer to go off the map, while others go for the risk reduction option, safe in the knowledge that there won’t be any surprises.

Tourist or traveller?

Tourist or traveller?

So, are you a tourist or a traveller when it comes to translated fiction?  Should cultural context be served up on a plate, or should the reader be allowed to explore it, completely off the map??

I asked both authors,  …in Italian.

Read the rest of this entry

Multilingual Blogging Day 2013: Secret Language Series 2

Standard

Thanks for checking back in for another instalment of the Secret Language Series for Multilingual Blogging Day 2013

Who dunnit? Not telling!!! 

To find out who got the gold in Il Mistero dell’Oro di Dongo, you’ll probably have to read the book, sorry! But in the meantime, I’ve become a bit of a sleuth myself, and managed to put my second language skills to good use, as I contacted the author, Paolo di Vincenzo, for a chat. 

Ci sono molto vantaggi di avere una seconda lingua, il primo ovviamente e’ poter leggere dove era e chi ha trovato l’Oro di Dongo! Mi dispiace, io non ve lo posso svelare (rovinerebbe la sorpresa, adesso che avete acquisto il libro!) ma ho pensato di mettere la mia seconda lingua e vostro disposizione, per riportare qualche notizia direttamente dal autore stesso, Paolo Di Vincenzo.

In verita’, avrei potuto fare a meno di tirare fuori quest’arma letale (il mio italiano!) perche’ anche Paolo ha una seconda lingua: inglese!

Pazienza, come dicono in Italia, la vita e’ bella e andiamo avanti cosi. 

Introducing Paolo Di Vincenzo

paolo di vincenzo

Paolo’s writing has a very journalistic feel to it, having worked in the news industry for more than 27 years.

Read the rest of this entry

2013 Multilingual Blogging Day

Standard

Speaking a second language… what’s that all about?

Today it’s about Multilingual Blogging, Internet Week Europe and highlighting the multilingual dimension of the web.

The rest of the time it’s normally just work for me, but for my 8-year old… it’s much, more more ……..

Compiti d'Italiano Testo Narrativo.  M. Di Nella, 8 anni

Compiti d’Italiano
Testo Narrativo.
M. Di Nella, 8 anni

Ooh, speaking English, my daughter’s first-second-first language (not sure, she’s bilingual) is like a secret language for her. That makes it sound quite magical (or cloak and dagger, depending on your point of view), but however you see it, the sense is definitely one of getting special entry to a world and to information that would otherwise be inaccessible. 

Speaking a second language, or reading a book in a translated language, opens up new worlds and makes you feel at home in strange lands. And it can set a child’s imagination on fire, as Philip Pullman states in the foreword to Outside In’sChildren’s Books in Translation” publication and as my daughter told her teacher in last night’s homework. She feels like she has special powers, she feels special, that’s certainly got to rate high on the what-to-give-your-child for Christmas list! A second language.

Chiedere …. sempre in incognito

Allora, cogliendo lo spirito da detective di mia figlia, usero’ la mia seconda lingua,  italiano, per indagare un po’ sulla letteratura e vedere quello che scopro.

Read the rest of this entry

Acqua Dolce – a clean&contemporary fairy-tale for young solo readers

Standard

ACQUA DOLCE by Andrea Bouchard, published in the Italian by Adriano Salani Editore.

ACQUA DOLCE … the water baby, is a heart-warming and magically realistic tale about a girl born in the magical waters of an enchanted island in an exotic, faraway land when her father and pregnant mother jump out of a plane into the bewitching waters below. True to the tradition of tragicomic opening scenes, the mum’s parachute doesn’t open leaving her hurtling – tummy and all – towards the sea, and magically, on landing she finds that the sea is not salty, it is fresh water. Ergo Acqua Dolce, the beautiful, blue-eyed water baby, born – as if by miracle – in the fresh water.

Acqua Dolce  by Andrea Bouchard

Acqua Dolce
by Andrea Bouchard

Read the rest of this entry